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Weapon of Mass Destruction in Uganda

 For full screen view, please click on this link https://goo.gl/GA2EBY     

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Report on Training Qualitative Research Investigators

Deducing from the trainees’ evaluation of the training, it is the conviction of CPAR Uganda Ltd that the training that it conducted for five members of staff of three TWENDE Consortium partner organizations from Tanzania and Kenya was beneficial to the trainees and their respective organisations.

CPAR is convinced that the training that it conducted significantly contributed to enhancing the knowledge and skills of  TWENDE qualitative investigators (QIs); which ‘new’ knowledge and skills the QIs utilised as it was intended to collect useful empirical qualitative data for TWENDE.

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End TB Inform the Population

 

“It is where she was working as a maid for Indians that is where she got the problem. When you are cooking their food you have to put a lot of chillies in it,” explained Mother of how she believes her teenage Daughter got infected with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). This was April 2017, during an interview with CPAR Uganda Ltd (CPAR).

Shortly after Daughter returned home from town, according to Mother, “one evening she vomited a lot of blood at around 5:00 p.m.” On seeing his granddaughter vomit blood, he apparently cried out in resignation: “she is finished, she is going to die.” Mother said that she remained strong and that she re-assured her father: “In the name of Jesus, she is not going to die.”

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2016-2017 Tuberculosis Study on NTV

According to the National Tuberculosis Survey that was conducted by the Ministry of Health, Uganda gets 87,000 new cases of tuberculosis each year. That means that for every 100,000 people, 253 new individuals are being infected by this highly infectious and deadly airborne disease annually. Watch as the CPAR Uganda Ltd Managing Director, Ms. Norah Owaraga, speaks about the 2016-2017 study conducted by CPAR Uganda on a disease that has been eradicated in so many other parts of the world, and what should be done in Uganda today. 

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Reduce Costs of Tuberculosis Healthcare Management

With a tuberculosis (TB) prevalence rate of 253/100,000 among its population or a country TB incidence rate of 87,000 cases annually Uganda has a high TB burden. Worse still, according to the Uganda national TB survey, a significant proportion of pulmonary TB (PTB) patients in Uganda are unaware that they are in fact afflicted with an airborne disease that is highly infectious and which they continue to spread. This is because thousands of suspected PTB patients in Uganda are not getting tested for they are not proactively seeking PTB diagnostic services.

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TB an Enormous Health Challenge to Uganda

Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) that is otherwise sometimes referred to as tuberculosis (TB) of the lungs is a disease that has been eradicated in most parts of the world, but continues to persist in Uganda. PTB, moreover, is a highly infectious, debilitating and deadly airborne disease, but which is preventable and curable.

As is the case with all airborne infectious diseases, early diagnosis of PTB and the isolation and treatment of those infected with active mycobacterium TB is the most efficient way to slow down PTB infection rates and or to prevent its geographical spread.

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Empirical Qualitative Data on TB in Uganda

CPAR Uganda Ltd (CPAR) is satisfied that it has successfully implemented its role as part of the Tuberculosis: Working to Empower the Nations’ Diagnostic Efforts (TWENDE) Consortium. TWENDE was an EDCTP funded research and policy advocacy project which was implemented from January 2016 to December 2017 in the three East African Countries of Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania.

In Uganda, CPAR was responsible for conducting a high impact TWENDE qualitative investigation that uncovers and addresses the impediments for implementation of health research innovations; explores the attitude of health care staff and administrators to funding of tuberculosis (TB) medical tests; unravel the impediments to wider uptake of effective TB diagnostics; engage policy makers; and explore reasons why in places TB assays are unavailable.

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Obsolete TB Diagnostic Machines Miss 60% of Cases in Uganda

Ugandans travel long distances seeking tuberculosis (TB) diagnostic services because most of the lower level health facilities – health centre Is, health centre IIs and health centre IIIs – are equipped, if at all, with obsolete light microscopes used to diagnose PTB by the smear microscopy technique.

The first Uganda national TB Survey that was conducted by Ministry of Health in 2015, moreover, found that “smear microscopy, the main TB diagnostic test in the country, misses about 60% of the cases”; a finding which led the Ministry of Health to conclude that there is a “need to update the country’s TB screening and diagnostic algorithms.”

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Under Financing TB Healthcare in Uganda 2013 to 2017

Uganda’s first national tuberculosis (TB) survey which was conducted by the Ministry of Health in 2015 estimates that Uganda has 87,000 TB cases annually; an annual prevalence rate of 253/100,000; and a rate that is higher than had previously been thought.

High level Government of Uganda officials, such as the Minister of Health, Hon. Dr. Jane Ruth Aceng, moreover,  acknowledge that Uganda’s “TB burden has continued to cause an enormous health challenge to the people of Uganda and is a big public health challenge to the health system in Uganda. Additionally, TB presents an economic challenge and impacts negatively on the livelihood of our people.” It is therefore baffling that Uganda national budgets for TB management are consistently underfunded.

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Plight of TB Patients in Uganda

The situation of tuberculosis (TB) patients in Uganda “has changed a lot because we now have drugs or oral tablets administered for treating TB for 6-8 months depending. TB is curable and thanks to that. I took TB treatment for six months and got well,” wrote Acheng Tabitha in response to the question: “This was over 25 years ago, but has the situation changed at all – for good or for bad?” which was posted on social media together with a testimony of a TB survivor from 25 years ago.

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